Travel Funding

George P. Cuttino Scholarship for Independent Research Abroad

Professor George P. Cuttino was a distinguished medieval historian in the Department of History for 32 years. In 1982 he provided a gift to the university to establish a scholarship endowment fund to aid history undergraduate students conducting research in overseas libraries. The George P. Cuttino Scholarship for Independent Research Abroad was established in 1985 and commemorates Professor Cuttino's commitment to undergraduate teaching in the Department of History.
 
The Cuttino Scholarship is offered annually to rising senior history majors or joint majors in Emory College. The scholarship provides for a summer of research and travel abroad between the students’ junior and senior year. The stipend may be up to $10,000. All junior history majors and joint majors in Emory College with a cumulative G.P.A. of 3.0 or above are eligible. Early in the spring semester (normally mid-February) a notice with deadline for submission of Cuttino Scholarship applications to the Director of Undergraduate Studies is issued. The Cuttino Scholarship recipient is selected by the Department of History Undergraduate Committee and the announcement of the committee's decision is normally made in early to mid-March (exact date to be determined each year).
 
Applicants must provide a proposal -- no more than 1,000 words or 3 double-spaced pages -- as to how they plan to utilize the scholarship if awarded. The proposal should describe the nature and value of the proposed research topic and include a precise research plan, itinerary, and anticipated budget (airfare, lodging, tuition, etc.). Students also need to ask a faculty member familiar with their work to submit a letter of recommendation.
 
In his/her senior year, the Cuttino Scholarship recipient must submit an oral or written report suitable for presentation or distribution to fellow history students and faculty detailing his/her use of the scholarship and the benefits garnered from it.


Past Recipients of the George P. Cuttino Scholarship for Independent Study Abroad

  • 2017: John A. Gillen, Jeffrey L. Haylon, Hannah M. Helmey, Gweneviere N. Sommer
  • 2016: Emily J. Coady
  • 2015: Jane J. Chang, Man Hon Ronny Choi, Lily M. Faust, Faith Y. Huh, Michael R. Van Ginkel
  • 2014: William L. Hupp; Oliver M. Paprin; Benjamin A.K. Sinvany
  • 2013: Kurtis G. Anderson; Daniel A. Kuzmanovich
  • 2012: Zachary Domach, Hyeok Kang, Jacob Murphy, Michal Schatz, Delia Solomon
  • 2011: Laura Eakes, Sarah Graveline, Marissa Lambert & Luke Reimer
  • 2010: John Gibson & Michael Small
  • 2009: Samantha M. Grow, Benjamin P. Hein, Matthew D. Kim, Haley L. Steed, Christina C. Welsch & Rachel M. White
  • 2008: Mark A. Pienkowski & Eric S. Schaffer
  • 2007: Ethan Z. Schiff, Elizabeth K. Saluke & Ian M. Whittle
  • 2006: Shari G. Kashani, Meris M.Lutz, Benjamin D. Siegel & Matthew B. Walker
  • 2005: Brian A. Leeke & Priya Roy
  • 2004: Peter Clericuzio & Ethan Zinn
  • 2003: Dov Weinryb Grohsgal & Christina Mason
  • 2002: Michael Garemko & Andrew Stephens
  • 2001: Christina Hansen
  • 2000: Eric Desobe & Robert Rutland-Brown
  • 1999: Justin Shireman
  • 1998: No Scholarship Awarded
  • 1997: Joshua Cox
  • 1996: Grace Lee
  • 1995: Sarah Wycoff
  • 1994: No Scholarship Awarded
  • 1993: Deborah Morris
  • 1992: Edda Fields & Michael O'Hare
  • 1991: Mike Gibson
  • 1990: Douglas Goff
  • 1989: William R. Knox
  • 1988: Chadwick Colburn
  • 1987: Erika J. Thorgerson
  • 1986: Lisa M. Higdon
  • 1985: Jonathan S. Jennings

George P. Cuttino Fellowship for Summer Programs Abroad

Professor George P. Cuttino was a distinguished medieval historian in the Department of History for 32 years. In 1982 he provided a gift to the University to establish a scholarship endowment fund to aid history undergraduate students conducting research in oversears libraries. That endowment has supported the George P. Cuttino Scholarship for Independent Study Abroad since 1985. Additionally in summer of 1998, the Department of History made the George P. Cuttino Fellowships for Summer Programs Abroad available.

The Cuttino Fellowships for Summer Programs Abroad are offered annually to rising senior history and joint history majors in Emory College for study outside the United States in a summer study program. Priority is given to students enrolled in Emory Study Abroad programs. Several awards are given each year and can be as much as $4,000 each. The recipients of the fellowships must provide documentation of enrollment in an academic summer study abroad program in order to receive the awarded funds. Upon returning to Emory in the fall, the recipients must also provide documentation of their successful completion of the summer study program.

Early in the spring semester (normally mid-February) a notice with deadline for submission of Cuttino Fellowship applications to the Director of Undergraduate Studies is issued. To apply the student must provide a typed, double-spaced description of study plans, to include the advantages of the program selected and a justification for taking the chosen classes. Reference should also be made to requisite language skills, any summer research plans, and related future academic intent. A proposed budget (most study abroad programs work on a fixed fee) must be provided. The application must be supported by a letter from a Deparment of History professor knowledgeable in the research area or study proposed.


Past Recipients of the George P. Cuttino Fellowship for Summer Programs Abroad

  • 2017: Gweneviere Sommer
  • 2016: No Fellowship Awarded
  • 2015: Jane J. Chang
  • 2014: Mingshu Liu
  • 2013: Arish Jamil
  • 2012: Christian Conway
  • 2011: No Fellowships Awarded
  • 2010: Jerry Kent & Nicholas Maisel
  • 2009: No Fellowships Awarded
  • 2008: Dev C. Patel, Matthew C. Zorn
  • 2007: Christina T. Hagan
  • 2006: Andrew H. Dekle, Meghan L. Weddle
  • 2005: Mehmet Baysan, Michael R. Handler, Lisa M. Koerner, Vikas Kumar, R. Matthias Whitson-Singer
  • 2004: William Evans, Christopher May, Matthew Spritz, James Tarter
  • 2003: Spencer Dean, Darcy Valenta, Brian Wolfe
  • 2002: Rebecca Campbell, Benjamin Casson, Kathleen Cerniglia, Indhira Gnanasekaran, Heather Lee
  • 2001: Jennifer Anderson, Jessica Paletsky
  • 2000: Angela Cronan, Sam Radin, Jane Ricci, Daria Snadowsky
  • 1999: Matthew Carter, Rachel Gerrick, Staci Nakayama, Holly Sterling
  • 1998: Amanda Dixon, Kara Van Dorsten, Julie Levi, Terri Lipscomb

Theodore H. Jack Award

In 1992, Mrs. Mary Spencer Jack Craddock ('33C) made a contribution to Emory in honor of her father, Theodore Henley Jack, an historian and early Emory history faculty. In 1916 Dr. Jack was selected to head the Department of History of the new Emory College. He became Dean of the Graduate School in 1919, Dean of the College of Liberal Arts in 1920, and Vice-president of Emory University in 1929. Mrs. Craddock's gift honors her father's commitment to Emory and to historical scholarship.

The Theodore H. Jack Award is offered annually to an Emory College history major or joint history major who has attained senior status (75+ credit hours) at the time of the award. It provides modest funds for summer research in the United States outside the city of Atlanta on topics that deal in whole or in part with American history. It is expected that recipients will use the award to research an honors thesis, though students not in the honors program are welcome to apply.

All history and joint history majors with senior status in Emory College with a cumulative G.P.A. of 3.0 or above are eligible. Upon returning to Emory in the fall semester, the recipient of the award must make a formal oral presentation to the department on his/her research experience and results.  A call for applications is distributed each year, usually in February or early March.


Past Recipients of the Theodore H. Jack Award

  • 2017: No Award Given
  • 2016: Molly E. Behan, Rebecca J. Flikier, Paul A. Hunt, Caleb L. H. Parsons
  • 2015: Emily E. Moore, Shannon A. Stillmun, Gideon I. Weiss
  • 2014: Nathaniel H. Meyersohn; Samuel N. Sobul; Erica S. Sterling; Rachel S. Stuart
  • 2013: Maija-Liisa Ehlinger; Benjamin Leiner; Jordan Naftalis

James L. Roark Prize

The James L. Roark Prize will be awarded annually to advanced undergraduate History majors (75+ credit hours). The award will provide funds for undergraduate research in American history to be conducted within the United States over one summer.  Recipients will be expected to use the prize towards research for an honors thesis, or a similarly significant research project.

James L. Roark was the Samuel Candler Dobbs Professor of American History and taught at Emory from 1983 to 2016. A first generation college student, Professor Roark embarked on an academic journey that took him from community college to Nigeria with the Peace Corps, to Stanford for his doctorate, and to Emory as one of his generation's most influential historians of the American South. Professor Roark was, above all, a steward of the Emory community, having mentored hundreds of undergraduate students, advised groundbreaking theses, and served two terms as Department Chair.

Prior to his retirement, Professor Roark was known throughout the Emory community as a revered professor, trusted colleague, and beloved mentor. As such, the James L. Roark Prize is not only an invitation to conduct research, but also a charge to honor Professor Roark’s legacy of service to the Emory community.

All History majors and joint History majors with a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or above are eligible to apply for the Roark Prize. Recipients must demonstrate commitment to original historical research in American history and Professor Roark’s dedication to the greater Emory community. A call for applications is distributed each year, usually in January. The Roark Prize consists of two awards of $500 or, in exceptional cases, of one award of $1,000.

To apply, students need to submit a research proposal (no more than 1,000 words) as to how they plan to utilize the Roark Prize if awarded. The proposal should describe the nature and value of the research topic and include a research plan and anticipated budget. Applicants also need to submit a resume that showcases their engagement in the Emory community. The application must be supported by a faculty recommendation letter that comments on the quality of the research proposal and the student’s community involvement.

Upon returning to Emory in the Fall semester, the recipient of the award must make a formal oral presentation to the Department on his/her research experience and results.


Past Recipients of the James L. Roark Prize

  • 2017: No Prize Awarded