History Spring 2013 Course Atlas

Courses

HIST 584-000: Research Workshop in History

HIST 585-000: 20th Century African American History

HIST 585-001: Law & History in Colonial Cultures in the Atlantic World
(cross-listed with AFS 585-000, ANT 585-000, SPAN 540-000)

HIST 585-002: Sacred Biography
(crosslisted with MESAS 570-000 and RLAR 711-000)

HIST 585-003: Seminar in Digital Scholarship & Media Studies


P-Sections, HIST 786B, and Research Courses




 HIST 584-000: Research Workshop in History

Instructor Day(s) Time(s) Maximum Enrollment
Lesser/Melton TU 1:00 - 4:00 pm 15

Semester Details:

This course is required of all first-year students in the History Ph.D. program.

This course focuses on methods for research and approaches to the writing of primary source based research papers.  The workshop format is intended to give students the opportunity to share their work, and receive comments on it, from colleagues focusing on a range of topics and using a variety of approaches and historiographies.

First-year graduate students in History normally complete a research paper that grows out of a graduate seminar taken the previous semester.  This project thereby fulfills the first of the History program¿s two required research papers.  Primary responsibility for directing the student¿s research paper lies with the project adviser, with whom the student will meet on an individual basis to identify and formulate topics.  Concurrently throughout the semester, students will meet as a group with the workshop directors to discuss and present work in progress.  As such, the workshop seeks to provide students with a formal venue that encourages and sustains engagement with their own research and that of their peers.   By the end of the semester, students are expected to have completed their research papers. 

Required Textbooks, Articles, and Resources:

None.




HIST 585-000:  20th Century African American History

Instructor Day(s) Time(s) Maximum Enrollment
Davis W
4:00 - 7:00 pm 12

Semester Details:

This graduate seminar examines some of the significant issues, intellectual and practical questions now engaging scholars of the 20th Century African American experience.  Issues relating to the importance of civil and human rights, power relations, African American nationalism, black transnational relations, African American leadership, intraracial and interracial class, gender, and race, are all subjects scrutinized in the various readings.  In addition, readings raise questions about urban and rural culture, black masculinity, regional and color differences, religion and political activism, and activist approaches to full equality (i.e. nonviolence vs. self-defense), especially in the Civil Rights and Black Power phases of the African American freedom movement.

Required Textbooks, Articles, and Resources:

Will be announced in class.

Grading:

  • There are no class examinations. 
  • Requirements include oral presentations, class discussion, and short essays.



HIST 585-001: Law & History in Colonial Cultures in the Atlantic World
(cross-listed with AFS 585-000, ANT 585-000, SPAN 540-000)

Instructor Day(s) Time(s) Maximum Enrollment
Mann/Yannakakis
W
1:00 - 4:00 pm 8

Semester Details:

How did law shape everyday life in colonial societies in the Atlantic World?  How did legal institutions develop through imperial expansion and cultural and linguistic contact?  How did the law facilitate colonial domination, and in what ways did it allow colonized peoples to pursue their own objectives?  How did colonial legal encounters shape property regimes and labor systems, including slavery and domestic production? How can the study of law illuminate the negotiation of politics, identity, and memory in colonial societies? By investigating such matters, what new can we learn about gender? This course examines these large questions comparatively, focusing on the cases of Latin America and Africa. We encourage students to think not only about specific histories, but also about the sources and methods at play in historical studies of law and society.

Required Textbooks, Articles, and Resources:  

Tenatively:

  1. Benton, Lauren. 2001. Law and Colonial Cultures: Legal Regimes in World History, 1400-1900.
    ISBN:
    Cambridge University Press.
  2. Kellogg, Susan. 1995. Law and the Transformation of Aztec Culture, 1500-1700.
    ISBN:
    University of Oklahoma Press.
  3. Roberts, Richard. 2005. Litigants and Households: African Disputes and Colonial Courts in the French Soudan, 1895-1912.
    ISBN:
    Heinemann.
  4. Mann, Kristin. 2007. Slavery and the Birth of an African City: Lagos, 1760-1900.
    ISBN:
    Indiana University Press.
  5. Owensby, Brian, 2008. Empire of Law and Indian Justice in Colonial Mexico.
    ISBN:
    Stanford University Press.
  6. Premo, Bianca. 2005. Children of the Father King: Youth, Authority, and Legal Minority in Colonial Lima.
    ISBN:
    University of North Carolina Press.
  7. Rathbone, Richard. 1993. Murder and Politics in Colonial Ghana. 
    ISBN:
    Yale University Press.
  8. Gotkowitz, Laura. 2007. A Revolution for Our Rights: Indigenous Struggles for Land and Justice in Bolivia, 1880-1952.
    ISBN:
    Duke University Press.
  9. Berry, Sara S. 2000. Chiefs Know their Boundaries: Essays on Property, Power, and the Past in Asante, 1896-1996.
    ISBN:
    Heinemann.
  10. Shadle, Brett Lindsay. 2006. ¿Girl Cases¿: Marriage and Colonialism in Gusiiland Kenya, 1890-1917.
    ISBN:
    Praeger.
  11. Charles, John. 2010. Allies at Odds: The Andean Church and Its Indigenous Agents, 1583-1671.
    ISBN:
    University of New Mexico Press. 
  12.  Fabian, Johannes. 1991. Language and Colonial Power.
    ISBN:
    University of California Press.

Recommended Textbooks, Articles, and Resources:

Tenatively:

  1. Mann, Kristin and Richard Roberts. 1991. Law in Colonial Africa.
    ISBN:
    Heinemann/James Currey.
  2. Peters, Pauline. 1994. Dividing the Commons: Politics, Policy, and Culture in Botswana.
    ISBN:
    University of Virginia Press.
  3. Lawrance Benjamin, Emily Osborne, and Richard Roberts. 2006. Intermediaries, Interpreters, and Clerks: African Employees in the Making of Colonial Africa.
    ISBN:
    University of Wisconsis Press.
  4. Chanock, Martin. 1998. Law, Custom, and Social Order: The Colonial Experience in Malawi and Zambia.
    ISBN:
    Heinemann.
  5. Dueñas, Alcira. 2010. Indians and Mestizos in the "Lettered City": Reshaping Justice, Social Hierarchy, and Political Cuture in Colonial Peru.
    ISBN:
    University of Colorado Press.
  6. Borah, Woodrow. 1983. Justice by Insurance: The General Indian Court of Colonial Mexico and the Legal Aides of the Half-Real.
    ISBN:
    University of California Pres.
  7. Herzog, Tamar. 2004. Upholding Justice: Society, State, and the Penal System in Quito (1650-1750).
    ISBN:
    University of Michigan Press.
  8. Cutter, Charles R. 1997. The Legal Culture of Northern New Spain 1700-1810.
    ISBN:
    University of New Mexico Press.

Grading:

  •  Class participation (15%);
  • Response papers (20%);
  • Oral presentation (10%);
  • Short paper/literature review (20%); and
  • Final paper (35%).

Syllabus:

Forthcoming.




HIST 585-002:  Sacred Biography
(crosslisted with MESAS 570-000 and RLAR 711-000)

Instructor

Day(s) Time(s) Maximum Enrollment
Newby
TH
2:30 - 5:30 pm 5

Semester Details:

Pre-Requisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor.

Sacred biographies, the lives of religious founders, such as Muhammad, and Jesus, and hagiographies, the stories of saints or their equivalents, convey through their narratives and through their symbols the fundamental truths, value systems and teachings of their religious traditions. In these genres, historical facts are blended with mythic elements to make powerful biographical images. These images are often as powerful as explicit theologies, philosophies or creeds in shaping the attitudes of believers toward such fundamental human and religious concerns as morality, the nature of humans, and the way to conduct one¿s daily life. Sacred biographies portray their subjects as divinely inspired paradigms for human conduct.

Using the development of the biography of Muhammad as the primary example, this course will examine the interplay between history and myth in the formation of sacred biography. Comparative examples will be drawn from the Jewish, Hindu and Christian traditions. The examination will use methods of History, History of Religions, Anthropology, Psychology and Literary Criticism.

Note: Students with interests in particular religious figures and/or traditions will be able to explore those interests within the context of the course.

Required Textbooks, Articles, and Resources:

TBA.

 



HIST 585-003: Seminar in Digital Scholarship & Media Studies
(cross-listed with DSMS 700-000 and ILS 790-009)

Instructor Day(s) Time(s) Maximum Enrollment
Tullos
W
1:00 - 4:00 pm 3

Semester Details:

This seminar offers an interdisciplinary introduction to digital technologies and their increasing presence in research and publication in the humanities and social sciences. The course will survey the digital humanities, internet history, network society, the production of knowledge in cyberspace, scholarly use of new media, intellectual property, and digital archives. Students will also develop digital skills and work on a semester project in their areas of interest. No technical expertise is needed to take the seminar.

Note: This seminar is the core seminar for Emory's graduate certificate in Digital Scholarship and Media Studies. For more information contact Prof. Tullos.

Required Textbooks, Articles, and Resources:

  1. Blum, Andrew. Tubes: A Journey to the Center of the Internet.
    ISBN:
  2. Berners-Lee, Tim. Weaving the Web.
    ISBN:
  3. Gold. Matthew K., ed., Debates in the Digital Humanities.
    ISBN:
  4. Hafner, Katie Hafner and Matthew Lyon. Where Wizards Stay Up Late.
    ISBN:
  5. Madeberg, Michael. The Social Media Reader.
    ISBN:

And various online readings.



¿HIST 508P-00P: Revoluntionary France 1750-1815

Instructor
Miller

Semester Details:

Permission of instructor required prior to enrollment. Paper writing section taken after fall 2012, HIST 508-000.


HIST 510P-00P: 20th Century Europe & the Problem of Historical Generations

Instructor
Amdur

Semester Details:

Permission of instructor required prior to enrollment. Paper writing section taken after fall 2012, HIST 510-000.


HIST 562P-00P:  Themes & Approaches in Latin American History: New Paradigms and Old Trends

Instructor
Lesser

Semester Details:

Permission of instructor required prior to enrollment. Paper writing section taken after fall 2012, HIST 562R-000.


HIST 566P-00P: African Historiography

Instructor
Crais

Semester Details:

Permission of instructor required prior to enrollment. Paper writing section taken after fall 2012, HIST 566-000.


HIST 585P-00P: American Cultural History 

Instructor
Goldstein

Semester Details:

Permission of instructor required prior to enrollment. Paper writing section taken after fall 2012, HIST 585-002.


HIST 585P-01P: African American History to 1877

Instructor
Harris

Semester Details:

Permission of instructor required prior to enrollment. Paper writing section taken after fall 2012, HIST 585-003.


HIST 585P-02P: Subalternity and Difference

Instructor
Pandey

Semester Details:

Permission of instructor required prior to enrollment. Paper writing section taken after fall 2012, HIST 585-003.


HIST 596R-00P: Special Studies

Semester Details:

Permission of instructor required prior to enrollment.


HIST 599R-00P: Research

Semester Details:

Variable credit course 1-12 hours. Permission of instructor required prior to enrollment.  For pre-candidacy students with at least 24 hours of coursework.

Grading:

Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory (S/U) only.


HIST 786B-00P: Introduction to College Teaching

Semester Details:

2 credit hours.  Permission of instructor required prior to enrollment.  The student works with a member of the department in conducting a course, including given an occasional lecture or leading a discussion group.

Grading:

Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory (S/U) only.


HIST 799R-00P: Advanced Research

Semester Details:

Variable credit course 1-12 hours.  Permission of instructor required prior to enrollment.  Designed to give students in candidacy the opportunity to conduct dissertation research.

Grading:

Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory (S/U) only.